Review: Who Is America? on Showtime

This past Sunday, the new Sacha Baron Cohen show, Who Is America?, debuted on Showtime. If you don’t like satire, you won’t like this show (just wait, they’ll re-boot Two and a Half Men). If you like satire, you’ll love it. This show won’t bridge any cultural or political divide that currently exists. But, is that the job of a comedian? No. Is Who Is America? brutal? Yes.  Is it unfair? Perhaps.  Is it … Continue reading Review: Who Is America? on Showtime

Net Neutrality … Again

The past 1 year, 168 days, 22 hours, 10 minutes and 38 seconds (as of this writing) has seen a cavalcade morons march (or goose step, take your pick) into Washington. You might even say Washington is home to a League of Morons. It’s also no secret that the current administration, regardless of educational pedigree or class status, has the intellectual wisdom of an article … Continue reading Net Neutrality … Again

Podcast Review: In the Dark

Journalism is a tough racket. It always has been and it’s been made even more so with the explosion of the digital world, the never-ending media conglomeration and the polarization of political ideology. Today’s news appears to exist only in two worlds, one serves as propaganda and the other as a weak platform for resistance. Neither is ideal. Neither is representative. Because traditional news media … Continue reading Podcast Review: In the Dark

Review: Season Two of Goliath on Amazon Prime Video

The first season of Amazon’s Goliath was good. It was like a typical David E. Kelley show … but with swear words. In the second season, Kelley passes the showrunning duties to Clyde Phillips (Dexter) and Phillips raises the bar considerably. Not so much with the swear words but with the story and the performances (although there are still plenty of swear words). The 2017 … Continue reading Review: Season Two of Goliath on Amazon Prime Video

Review: Season Two of 13 Reasons Why on Netflix

“Anger is an energy.” Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why returned on Friday and while it’s hard not to mention the unfortunate timing of the release, this isn’t an opinion piece about gun control (although it very easily could be). While we grieve the latest school massacre and wait for the next one (because until things change, there will always be a next one) here are 13 … Continue reading Review: Season Two of 13 Reasons Why on Netflix

Podcast Review: This Sounds Serious

Every once in a while, something comes along that you just really want to hip everyone to ASAP because it’s so great. The last time I recall being this excited about something was when I discovered Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s Fleabag on Amazon Prime. This time it’s the podcast This Sounds Serious (click here or go wherever you get podcasts). Podcasts are a relatively new medium, so sifting through … Continue reading Podcast Review: This Sounds Serious

I was a bartender NOT a mixologist.

I recently re-launched wait(er) Magazine as a free iOS app (download here) and re-read this on my way in to work this morning and was rather pleased with myself…so I am re-posting it. _________________________________________ I was a bartender. I was never a mixologist. You may be asking yourself “what’s the difference”. They both make drinks in a food and/or beverage serving establishment. As the foodie … Continue reading I was a bartender NOT a mixologist.

Chew and Screw

From wait(er) Magazine, Issue 005. Reprinted by permission.   Chew and Screw by Keith R. Higgons You might think that an article titled “Chew and Screw” might be somewhat dirty. I suppose metaphorically, it is. Realistically though, it’s just one of many abominations that food and beverage workers are subjected to. To attempt to list every abomination would be a herculean task but some of … Continue reading Chew and Screw

Pox, Pasta but No PTO

wait(er) Magazine Reprinted with permission October 2013 One summer during college, I had three jobs. I worked at a bookstore, overnight at a gas station and weekends expediting at an Italian restaurant (for those unfamiliar, this is typically the person who preps and organizes the food before the server delivers it). It was pretty hellish and I never knew if I was coming or going … Continue reading Pox, Pasta but No PTO

2013 Greenpoint Film Festival Wrap Up

The WG News+Arts Reprinted with permission September  2013 After a successful opening night on Thursday, September 19, the third annual Greenpoint Film Festival wrapped on Sunday. Just as she has done in the previous two years, Festival Director Rosa Valado was able to tap into the creativity of our neighborhood as well as bring together a diverse group of films and filmmakers from around the … Continue reading 2013 Greenpoint Film Festival Wrap Up

Left of the Dial*

“The unexamined life is not worth living.” – Socrates What’s that saying “Today is the first day of the rest of your life”? or is it “What the fluck”? Either way, today I am launching my first digital magazine entitled wait(er). As the name suggests, it is a magazine devoted to stories about the front of the house workers of the restaurant industry. It would … Continue reading Left of the Dial*

Losing the Gamble

My first job when I moved back to New York City, ten years ago, was working in a subsection of the financial services industry. Getting a root canal, sans anesthetic, would be less uncomfortable then trying to describe the banality of that job and industry. Suffice it to say, I was miserable. Against almost everyone’s opinion, I up and quit after about 18 months without … Continue reading Losing the Gamble

Brooklyn Film Festival Review #4

Dragon Girls According to Inigo Westmeier’s bio, the director of Dragon Girls, he has some serious cinematic chops. He studied at the Film Academy in Moscow, did his graduate studies at Baden-Wuttemberg Film Academy and even had a scholarship to study at the UCLA Extension Entertainment Studies Department. That’s not too shabby of a background in film studies. Dragon Girls is his first feature film. … Continue reading Brooklyn Film Festival Review #4

Brooklyn Film Festival Review #3

Emanuel and the Truth About Fishes Movies are about suspension of reality, well the best ones are. I can’t say that Francesca Gregorini’s film Emanuel and the Truth About Fishes is one of the best ones but it is pretty damn good. Here’s the synopsis: Emanuel, a troubled girl, becomes preoccupied with her mysterious new neighbor, who bears a striking resemblance to her dead mother. … Continue reading Brooklyn Film Festival Review #3

Brooklyn Film Festival Review #2

A Series of Shorts: A different lens through which to see the world. Now more than ever, we must look to artists to see the world through their eyes because it is often the artists who hold the mirror up to society and provide us with a different lens through which to see the world. And for those artists who choose to work in the … Continue reading Brooklyn Film Festival Review #2

Brooklyn Film Festival Review #1

Three-pack screening of Bye, Freckle, and Hank and Asha at Windmill Studios The Brooklyn Film Festival is in full swing at indieScreen Cinema and Windmill Studios, both on Kent Avenue. With over 106 films from 24 countries spanning every genre, you are certain to find something you will enjoy. Saturday, I went to the three-pack screening of Bye, Freckle, and Hank and Asha at Windmill Studios. … Continue reading Brooklyn Film Festival Review #1

The Lowdown on an Upright Citizen: Comedian Anthony Apruzzese

The Lowdown on an Upright Citizen: Comedian Anthony Apruzzese by Keith R. Higgons Comedy is as much a part of the DNA of Brooklyn as country music is of Nashville. The list of comedians who have called Brooklyn home reads like a history lesson of the hysterical: Mel Brooks, Larry David, Woody Allen, Jackie Gleason, and current late night warriors Jimmy Kimmel and Jimmy Fallon, … Continue reading The Lowdown on an Upright Citizen: Comedian Anthony Apruzzese